St. Lucian Specialties

The creole heritage and French-English history of Saint Lucia gives the island's traditional cuisine a flavor that's unique and delicious. Throughout the year, festivals and holy days are celebrated with dishes that are de rigueur for every self-respecting local, like Good Friday when smoked herring is the breakfast of the day, Jounen Kweyol when roast breadfruit is enjoyed from a calabash bowl and Christmas when spicy sorrel is brewed from red blossoms to drink all day long.

  • Saltfish & Green Figs is the national dish of Saint Lucia, harking back to the nautical past when salted cod was a staple on long voyages. Stewed with seasoning peppers and onions, the saltfish is served with boiled, unripe bananas and enjoyed day in and day out across the island
  • Hot Bakes and Cocoa Tea is a favourite island breakfast, pairing a cup of delicious local cocoa, spices and milk savoury with hot, deep-fried bread like a savoury doughnut. Nothing can compare with an early start Lucian-style!
  • Lambi is the Patois name for conch, which is caught by local fishermen, extracted from its impressive shell and served up in restaurants across Saint Lucia, whether it's in a Creole-spiced stew at a street stand or a fine-dining creation at a top restaurant.
  • Want to keep it really authentic? While bouillon may be a stock cube in some cuisines, in Saint Lucia it's a hearty, rustic stew containing pig tail or some other exotic cut of meat, simmered in one pot with ground provisions, seasonings and hand-rolled dumplings.
  • Lionfish is new to Saint Lucia's tables, but cooks and chefs around the island are creating new recipes and special dishes to encourage the fishing of this highly invasive, destructive species. Once the dramatic spines are gone, lionfish is a tender, white and delicious fish which is becoming an eco-friendly trend in the island.